HALF DAY WORKSHOPS - Thursday 16th , Friday 17th & Saturday 18th July

Delegates attending the BABCP Conference will be able to attend one or more of the in-conference workshops (2.5 hours approx). There is a charge for the workshops and it will be necessary to book in advance since places will be limited and some may have become fully subscribed in advance. It will be on a ‘first come first serve basis’. To register for workshops please click to the right...

 

 

Thursday 16th July 1.30-4.00pm
Workshop 1

Assessing and treating a Specific Phobia of Vomiting
David Veale, Instiute of Psychiatry, Kings College London, UK

Workshop 2

Service-user involvement: A practical workshop about a collaborative approach
Elaine Hewis, trainer and lecturer in mental health from the lived experience, Exeter

Workshop 3

Working with substance use linked to emotional disorders
Tim Meynen, Tamara Morrison, Luke Mitcheson and
Jenny Maslin, South London and Maudsley Foundation NHS Trust, UK

Friday 17th July 9.00-11.30am

Workshop 4

Understanding and Enhancing Patient Control with the Method of Levels
Tim Carey, University of Canberra, Australia

Workshop 5

Body Checking, Body Avoidance, and Feeling Fat
Christopher Fairburn, University of Oxford, UK

Workshop 6

Systematic implementation of IAPT supervision
Derek Milne, Newcastle University, UK, and
David Richards, University of Exeter, UK

Workshop 7

The therapy relationship in CBT: practical skills
Louise Waddington, Cardiff and Vale NHS Trust, UK and
John Manley, Clinical Director, Lambeth IAPT

Friday 17th July 1.30-4.00pm

Workshop 8

Treating patients with profound, chronic, refractory obsessive-compulsive disorder
Lynne Drummond and Shashi Rani, South West London and St George’s Mental Health Trust, UK

Workshop 9

Using behavioural experiments and surveys in CBT for people with eating disorders
Dr Victoria Mountford, South West London and St George’s Mental Health Trust,UK, and Dr Glenn Waller, Institute of Psychiatry, King’s College London, UK

Workshop 10

Working with interpreters whilst using CBT: Rationale, Approach and Key Skills
Pat Eschoe and Linda Matthews, Barnsley Primary Care NHS Trust, UK

Saturday 18th July 9.00-11.30am

Workshop 11

Using self esteem groups as part of an intensive group programme for people with eating disorders
Linette Whitehead, Cotswold House, UK, and
Jill Roberts, Oxford Cognitive Therapy Centre, UK

Workshop 12

Positive Psychology Based Interventions
Dr Ilona Boniwell, University of East London, UK

 

DETAILS OF EACH WORKSHOP ARE GIVEN BELOW:

  • W 1
  • W 2
  • W 3
  • W 4
  • W 5
  • W 6
  • W 7
  • W 8
  • W 9
  • W 10
  • W 11
  • W 12

Workshop 1 - Queens Room D

Assessing and treating a Specific Phobia of Vomiting
David Veale, Instiute of Psychiatry, Kings College London, UK

A Specific Phobia of Vomiting (SPOV) commonly develops in childhood with a mean duration of about 25 years and occurs almost exclusively in women (Veale and Lambrou, 2006; Lipsitz and Fyer, 2001). Clinicians generally regard SPOV as more difficult to treat and different in psychopathology compared to other specific phobias. People with SPOV tend to be more handicapped than people with other specific phobias (for example avoidance of a desired pregnancy or being significantly underweight from restriction of food). There is very little research in SPOV and no controlled trials in SPOV. It is however possible to use many of the advances in other disorders such as OCD and health anxiety for understanding the factors that maintain the preoccupation, distress and handicap in SPOV.  Our team provides a national service for treating SPOV and we are developing a research programme for assessing and treating SPOV.
A SPOV is not a common specific phobia that presents for therapy but when it does most therapists seek help as patients may be difficult to engage. By the end of the workshop participants will be able to apply what they have learnt in the workshop to their everyday practice in treating SPOV and generalise some of the principles to other anxiety disorders.

Learning objectives:
By the end of the workshop, participants will be able to:

  1. Diagnose a Specific Phobia of Vomiting (and differentiate it from an eating disorder; OCD; health anxiety; panic or social phobia).
  2. Make a developmental formulation which can be used in engagement
  3. Describe a cognitive behavioural formulation and model for treating SPOV
  4. Use new assessment measures for monitoring SPOV
  5. Use a variety of strategies from imagery rescripting, exposure in imagination and in vivo, and behavioural experiments for dropping of safety and avoidance behaviours.

David Veale is a Consultant Psychiatrist in CBT at the South London and Maudsley Trust and The Priory Hospital North London. He is an Honorary Senior Lecturer at the Institute of Psychiatry, Kings College London. He is a Consultant at the Bethlem Royal Hospital which provides a national out-patient and residential service for people with SPOV and at the Priory Hospital North London which provides a specialist in-patient service for SPOV.  He has published about 70 peer-reviewed articles (mainly in OCD and BDD) and three self help books.

Key References:
Boschen, M. J. (2007). "Reconceptualizing emetophobia: a cognitive-behavioral formulation and research agenda." Journal of Anxiety Disorders 21(3): 407-19.
Lipsitz, J. D., A. J. Fyer, et al. (2001). "Emetophobia: preliminary results of an internet survey." Depression & Anxiety 14(2): 149-52.
Veale, D. and C. Lambrou (2006). "The psychopathology of vomit phobia." Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy 34(2): 139-150.
Veale, D. (in submission). Treating a specific phobia of vomiting. The Cognitive Behaviour Therapist.

Workshop 2 - Queens Room E

Service-user involvement: A practical workshop about a collaborative approach
Elaine Hewis, trainer and lecturer in mental health from the lived experience, based in Exeter, UK.

Service users have a wealth of information that can benefit research projects. However researchers are often unclear about the most effective ways of involving and using the experience and skills of service users within the research process. This workshop includes straightforward and practical measures for successful service user involvement, extending from the initial consultation process through to successful grant application. The importance of using language that can be understood by lay people and ensuring the research process results in honest and open collaboration, with both service user and researchers learning from each other, forms a core theme. Examples from a research for patient benefit project I am involved in will be used to highlight points throughout.
Implications for research practice: service user involvement is an important part of the research process and increasingly specified as a requirement by major funding bodies. In addition to benefits of involving service users, however, there are also the obligations placed on researchers to ensure they are able to understand people regardless of their education. They should also ensure service users feel valued and empowered within a truly honest and collaborative process.

Learning objectives:
This workshop is designed to:

  1. Discuss what service users regard as good practice in being asked to assist with the initial development, progression and implementation of a research project.
  2. Look at ways in which a researcher can enable a service user to feel valued and respected throughout the entire research process.
  3. Help researchers feel more confident in challenging the boundaries of formal research and implementing what service users truly value.

This will be achieved by presenting ‘good practice guidelines’ as drawn up by a group of service users who have been involved in  three research projects covering hearing voices, unusual beliefs and self-harm.

Elaine Hewis has many years experience of being a patient in both adolescent and adult mental health services. Her husband and daughter have lived experience of using the mental health system. Elaine works as a self employed trainer and lecturer in mental health, with a specific focus on hearing voices, self harm and suicide. She lectures on the Approved Mental Health Professionals degree course and teaches professional bodies throughout South West England, delivering workshops with both service users and professionals. She has been involved in two PhD students research projects, and is currently working with two research teams, who have been successful in gaining full grant funding for research into self-harm.

Workshop 3 - Queens Room F

Working with substance use linked to emotional disorders
Tim Meynen, Tamara Morrison, Luke Mitcheson and
Jenny Maslin, South London and Maudsley Foundation NHS Trust, UK

Clients who present for treatment for emotional problems may be relying on drugs or alcohol to improve their mood states or as a way of coping with perceived difficult life events. Unfortunately, this drug and alcohol use may help maintain the difficult emotions states that they are trying to get rid of and may undermine their own self-efficacy in dealing with distressing events. Co-existing mental health problems and drug and alcohol use can often appear complex and overwhelming for therapist, especially where the therapist perceives that they do not have the skills necessary to deal with the substance use. In such cases, clients can often find themselves waiting for referrals to specialist drug and alcohol services and worst still being bounced between services unable to decide the primary disorder.

This workshop is intended for those who wish to explore ways to help their clients understand their drug and alcohol use in context to management of their emotional problems and help them to break the cycle.

Learning objectives:

  • Participants will be given a historical, theoretical and empirical context for CBT treatment of substance misuse
  • Participants will learn how to formulate the origins and maintenance of substance use in context to emotional disorders. This will also include guidance as to how the therapist might collaboratively conceptualise the substance use with clients who are ambivalent about changing their use. 
  • Participants will learn and have experience of using some basic techniques which focus on helping clients develop alternative ways of regulating mood and dealing with unwanted cognitive events without relying on substance use.
  • Participants will also learn how to overcome challenges to the therapeutic alliance presented by substance use.

Training modalities:
The workshop will be interactive and include both experiential and didactic teaching. Participants will be encouraged to discuss their own cases.

All those taking the workshop currently work in South London and Maudsley Foundation NHS Trust and are based in the Lambeth Psychology Addictions Services. They have all contributed to “Applied Cognitive and Behavioural Approaches to the Treatment of Addiction: A Practical Treatment Guide” to be published by Wiley (in press).
Jenny Maslin is a Clinical Psychologist who has worked in Substance Misuse Services for South London and Maudsley NHS (Foundation) Trust for the last 5 years.  She works with clients at varying stages of their substance use career, who use a variety of substances and experience a range of psychological problems. She also provides training, along with her co-facilitators, in the use of CBT for clients with substance use and co-morbid difficulties.
Tamara Morrison, DClinPsy, is a Clinical Psychologist working in Lambeth Community Drug and Alcohol Service, South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust. She is an accredited psychotherapist with the BABCP
Tim Meynen is a chartered clinical psychologist who has worked in community and criminal justice Substance Misuse Services for South London and Maudsley NHS (Foundation) Trust for the last 6 years. He provides CBT training and supervision to both addictions and adult mental health staff for clients with substance use and co-morbid difficulties.
Luke Mitcheson is a chartered clinical psychologist who has worked in community and inpatient addictions treatment services for the past 15 years. He has published research related to the training and practice of motivational interviewing and is an accredited psychotherapist with the BABCP.

Key references:
Beck, A.T., Wright, F.D., Newman, C.F. and Liese, B.S. (Eds.) (1993) Cognitive Therapy of Substance Abuse. New York: The Guilford press.
Liese B & Franz R (1996). Treating Substance Use Disorders with Cognitive Therapy.  In P Salkovskis (ed) Frontiers of Cognitive Therapy. Guildford Press.
Padesky, C & Greenberger, D (1995). Mind Over Mood: Change How You Feel by Changing the Way You Think. The Guilford Press: London/New York.
Carroll, K. M. (1998). A Cognitive-Behavioural Approach: Treating Cocaine Addiction. Therapy Manuals for Drug Addiction. National Institute on Drug Abuse.

Workshop 4 - Queens Margaret Room 1

Understanding and Enhancing Patient Control with the Method of Levels
Tim Carey, University of Canberra, Australia

Control is essential to current evidence-based psychotherapies. Behavioural and cognitive therapies use strategies and techniques to enable patients to gain greater control over their thoughts and behaviours and, consequently, their feelings. Third wave cognitive behaviour therapies place a different emphasis on thought control and behavioural control and, instead, address attentional control. An understanding of how control works, therefore, may enhance the formulation and delivery of current psychotherapies.

Perceptual Control Theory (PCT) describes the process by which people control. From the principles of PCT a cognitive therapy called the method of levels (MOL) has been developed. MOL harnesses a client’s awareness to direct their attention to higher cognitive levels. In this way the client is enabled to become more aware of the nature of their difficulties. From this point of view a problem solving perspective is pursued and the client is assisted in generating solutions to their distress and achieving a sense of greater control over their life. As a way of helping clients focus on process rather than content, MOL can be used to enhance the effectiveness of treatments for specific problems and disorders and also to address issues in the delivery of treatment such as lack of engagement, poor motivation, and resistance.

Implications for clinical practice:

  • Improved understanding of the nature of patient’s psychological distress
  • Greater service efficiency leading to improved access to services for patients and increased capacity for therapists
  • Enhanced patient satisfaction through increased control over treatment decisions
  • Increased therapist effectiveness through an expanded theoretical framework
  • Greater cohesiveness between therapeutic approaches through the recognition of fundamental commonalities

A half day workshop on MOL was presented at the 2006 BABCP workshop in Warwick, a full day pre congress workshop was presented at the 2007 BABCP conference in Brighton, and another MOL workshop was presented by Dr Warren Mansell and Dr Sara Tai at the 2008 BABCP conference in Edinburgh. All workshops have been received positively as indicated by the feedback ratings of participants.

Learning objectives:
By the end of the workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Clarify the nature of control, how it can be disrupted, and how it might be restored.
  • Understand the role of awareness in symptom control.
  • Identify the role of awareness in their current practices.
  • Explore the implications of incorporating more awareness activities in their current practices to achieve greater patient control.
  • Participate in awareness focussing activities.
  • Experience shifting awareness of others through role-play.

Tim Carey PhD is an associate professor and course convenor of the Master of Clinical Psychology and PhD (Clin Psych) degrees at the University of Canberra. He has been developing and researching MOL in clinical settings in Australia and the UK since the late 1990’s. He is a well received international conference and workshop presenter. He uses MOL in his clinical practice and supervises others in the use of MOL.

Key References:
Carey, T. A. (2008). Hold that thought! Two steps to effective counseling and psychotherapy with the Method of Levels. Chapel Hill, NC: newview Publications.
Carey, T. A. (2008). Perceptual Control Theory and the Method of Levels: Further contributions to a transdiagnostic perspective. International Journal of Cognitive Therapy, 1(3), 237-255. (http://www.atypon-link.com/GPI/toc/ijct/1/3)
Carey, T. A., & Mullan, R. J. (2008). Evaluating the Method of Levels. Counselling Psychology Quarterly, 21(3), 1-10.

Workshop 5 - Queens Room D

Body Checking, Body Avoidance, and Feeling Fat
Christopher Fairburn, University of Oxford, UK

Body image problems are seen in a variety of psychiatric disorders but they are most prominent in the eating disorders and body dysmorphic disorder.  In this presentation a unified strategy for addressing these problems will be presented based on a new form of cognitive behaviour therapy for eating disorders.  The workshop will focus in particular on the modification of the over-evaluation of shape and weight and its main expressions (body checking, body avoidance and “feeling fat”).  Each of these features will be described in detail and then strategies and procedures for addressing them will be outlined and illustrated. Among the topics covered will be mirrors, reflections, scrutiny and comparison-making.

Learning objectives:

  1. Participants will be able to create an individualized conceptualization that fits the particular patient’s concerns
  2. Participants will be able to devise an individualized treatment programme
  3. Participants will be able to adjust the treatment to fit changes in the patient’s psychopathology

Christopher Fairburn is Wellcome Principal Research Fellow and Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Oxford.  He has an international reputation for the quality of his clinical work, research and teaching. 

Key references:
Fairburn CG, Cooper Z, Shafran R, Bohn K, Hawker D, Murphy R, Straebler S.  Enhanced cognitive behavior therapy for eating disorders: the core protocol. In Fairburn CG. Cognitive Behavior Therapy and Eating Disorders. New York: Guilford Press, 2008.

Workshop 6 - Queens Room E

Systematic implementation of IAPT supervision
Derek Milne, Newcastle University, UK, and David Richards, University of Exeter, UK

Clinical supervision is recognized as “a key activity , which will determine the success of the IAPT programme” (Turpin, 2008). However, despite its importance, the implementation of supervision remains unclear, both conceptually and practically. Reasons for this unsatisfactory situation include the generally weak research foundation (Ellis and Ladany, 1997) and the limited training that supervisors/supervisees receive (Townend, Iannata and Freeston, 2002). This is especially true in the case of IAPT supervision. Although thankfully there are published guidelines (Turpin, 2008), a competences framework (Roth & Pilling, 2008), and brief outlines (e.g. Richards & Suckling, 2008), there is as yet no systematic account. This requires a theory-practice integration of these (& related) resources with the best-available research evidence, which we will attempt.
Very important implications - supervision is the primary mechanism for ensuring that CBT is delivered with fidelity, and fidelity is required for the IAPT initiative to succeed.

Learning objectives:
Participants will be able to summarise the 5 elements of the systematic approach to implementing IAPT supervision

Derek Milne is Director of the Doctorate in Clinical Psychology training programme at Newcastle University. His professional specialization for the past 30 years has been staff development.
David Richards is Professor of Mental Health Services Research at the University of Exeter’s School of Psychology. He has developed the high volume clinical supervision methods for the IAPT demonstration site in Doncaster, and wrote the IAPT training materials for low-intensity therapies workers.

Key references:
Milne, D.L. (2009). Evidence-Based Clinical Supervision: Principles & Practice. Leicester: BPS/Blackwell.
Richards, D., & Suckling, R. (2008). Improving access to psychological therapy: The Doncaster demonstration site organizational model. Clinical Psychology Forum, 181, 9-16.

Workshop 7 - Queens Room F

The therapy relationship in CBT: practical skills
Louise Waddington, Cardiff and Vale NHS Trust, UK and
John Manley, Clinical Director, Lambeth IAPT
 
Effective CBT and a good therapy relationship tend to occur together (e.g. Muran, Gorman, Safran & Twining, 1995).  A good therapy relationship may facilitate cognitive therapy, for example by increasing compliance with homework or behavioural experiments. Effective cognitive therapy may also facilitate a good therapy relationship. This latter point can be explicitly welcomed and developed by CBT therapists by looking in detail at how CBT skills can be used to develop a good therapy relationship (e.g. Waddington, 2001).

This workshop aims to:

  1. increase participants awareness of the therapy relationship in CBT and how it can be assessed
  2. increase awareness of how the therapy relationship may be used to facilitate cognitive therapy
  3. give participants practice in applying CBT skills to improve the therapy relationship.

Clinical implications: Increased skill in using CBT to create a good therapy relationship.

Learning objectives:
Increased awareness of the benefits of good therapy relationship for effective CBT

Louise Waddington is a consultant clinical psychologist in the NHS and has worked on research trials of CBT for depression and anxiety disorders. She is an accredited BABCP trainer and supervisor.

Key references:
Waddington, L. (2001) The therapy relationship in cognitive therapy: a review BEHAVIOURAL AND COGNITIVE PSYCHOTHERAPY, 30, 179-191.
Hardy, G., Cahill, J., Shapiro, D., Barkham, M., Rees, A. & Macaskill, N. Client Interpersonal styles as predictors of response to time-limited cognitive therapy of depression. JOURNAL OF CONSULTING AND CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY

Workshop 8 - Queens Room D

Treating patients with profound, chronic, refractory obsessive-compulsive disorder
Lynne Drummond and Shashi Rani, South West London and St George’s Mental Health Trust, UK

This workshop, which proved popular last year in Edinburgh, will examine the treatment of patients with the most profound disorders and will be based on the experience of 2 clinicians who have worked with such patients from throughout the UK for over 20 years. The workshop will be highly interactive and informal and participants will be encouraged to bring their own difficult clinical issues for discussion.
Clinical implications: Practical approaches to profound OCD.

Learning objectives:

  • NICE Guidance for OCD
  • How to assess the patient with complex OCD
  • How to apply treatment in complex OCD

Lynne M Drummond trained with Isaac Marks and has run the National OCD/BDD Service since 1985. She has considerable clinical experience in pragmatic approaches and has published widely in the field.
R. Shashi Rani has worked at the National OCD/BDD Service since 1988. As well as a wealth of clinical experience, she has also published many papers about OCD treatments.

Key References:
DRUMMOND,L.M. (1993) The treatment of severe, chronic, resistant obsessive-compulsive disorder: An evaluation of an inpatient programme using behavioural psychotherapy in combination with other treatments. British Journal of Psychiatry,163, 223-229.
DRUMMOND,LM;PILLAY,A; RANI,RS and KOLB PJ  (2007) Specialised Inpatient Treatment for Severe, Chronic Resistant Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD); a naturalistic study of clinical outcomes. Psychiatric Bulletin. 31: 49-52.
DRUMMOND, L.M., FINEBERG, N.A, L HEYMAN,I., KOLB, P., PILLAY,A., RANI, R.S.  SALKOVSKIS, P.  and VEALE, D. (2008) Description of Progress in the Development of a National Service for Adolescents and Adults with the most Severe, Refractory Obsessive-Compulsive and Body Dysmorphic  disorder, Psychiatric Bulletin, 32, 333-336
BOSCHEN,M.J., DRUMMOND,L.M. and PILLAY,A. Treatment of severe, treatment-refractory obsessive-compulsive disorder: A study of inpatient and community treatment.CNS Spectrums, in press for publication December 2008.

Workshop 9 - Queens Room E

Using behavioural experiments and surveys in CBT for people with eating disorders
Dr Victoria Mountford, South West London and St George’s Mental Health Trust,UK, and
Dr Glenn Waller, Institute of Psychiatry, King’s College London, UK

In the eating disorders and their comorbid states, as with other areas of psychopathology, it is critical to determine the most powerful elements of cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT). Two such elements will be addressed in this skills-based workshop. First, behavioural experiments can be used to test and modify the central beliefs underlying the problem (i.e., the overevaluation of eating, weight and shape) and comorbid maintaining factors (e.g., the concerns about being negatively evaluated in social anxiety). There are unique behavioural markers that mean that the beliefs can be challenged in a very decisive way (particularly the patient’s weight). Second, surveys can be used where the individual’s beliefs are not immediately open to such overt challenges (e.g., where the patient ‘mind-reads’ about how others see their body). However, many clinicians often do not use these techniques to the best effect (or at all). This failure is often due to patients resisting change, and because challenging the beliefs directly can create significant anxiety in both clinician and patient. This workshop will focus on understanding and developing the skills needed to implement successful behavioural experiments and surveys with the eating disorders. The different types of behavioural experiment and survey will be discussed, and their suitability considered for different types of belief, stages in cognitive restructuring, and specific symptoms. Case material will be presented throughout to illustrate the key points, followed by an opportunity to discuss trouble-shooting for cases brought by participants.
This workshop is highly relevant to the everyday clinical practice of CBT, focusing on therapeutic techniques that have been demonstrated to be highly powerful, yet are under utilised, often due to clinician and patient anxiety. Although focusing in part on the eating disorders, the skills learnt in this workshop will be highly generalisable. Clinician anxiety and confidence in the use of these methods will also be addressed.

Learning objectives:
Participants will be able to understand the role of behavioural experiments and surveys in CBT, and to incorporate them into a treatment plan for both for eating disorder-specific beliefs and beliefs relating to comorbid difficulties.
Participants will learn how to develop and undertake these methods collaboratively with patients, how to evaluate success, and how to generalise to other areas.
Participants will be able to problem solve any difficulties that may arise during these interventions.

Dr Victoria Mountford is a Clinical Psychologist and CBT practitioner at SW London and St George’s Eating Disorder Service. She has experience in teaching and presenting on CBT and has a number of publications in journals and books.
Professor Glenn Waller is a Clinical Psychologist and CBT practitioner at Vincent Square Eating Disorders Clinic and Visiting Professor at the Institute of Psychiatry, King’s College London. He has written widely on the field of CBT and the eating disorders

Key references:
Bennett-Levy, J. (2003). Mechanisms of change in cognitive therapy: The case of automatic thought records and behavioural experiments. Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy, 31, 261-277.
Bennett-Levy, J., Butler, G., Fennell, M., Hackmann, A., Mueller, M., & Westbrook, D. (2004). Oxford guide to behavioural experiments in cognitive therapy. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Waller, G., Cordery, H., Corstorphine, E., Hinrichsen, H., Lawson, R., Mountford, V., & Russell, K. (2007). Cognitive-behavioural therapy for the eating disorders: A comprehensive treatment guide. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.

Workshop 10 - Queens Room F

Working with interpreters whilst using CBT: Rationale, Approach and Key Skills
Pat Eschoe and Linda Matthews, Barnsley Primary Care NHS Trust, UK

In recent years there has been a huge increase in asylum seekers in the UK, who have been victim to various trauma, abuse and humiliation in their home countries.  These people have obvious psychological needs and often require diligent and complex clinical interventions to facilitate recovery from trauma (or at least some sign of assimilation of the experiences). Due to differences in language, CBT therapists typically require the services of interpreters to deliver sessions, which alters the therapeutic dynamic and presents many practical difficulties in itself. Therefore both the interpreter and the therapist may be faced with delivering a service, with little training or awareness of how to effectively manage the situation and maximise clinical outcomes.

Learning objectives:
This workshop is designed to help CBT therapists:

  1. have an awareness of best practice in terms of establishing the boundaries and processes of the therapy,
  2. management of the therapeutic alliance,
  3. management of the interpreter in terms of inexperience of therapeutic processes and possible vicarious trauma,
  4. ensuring the sound governance of what is actually said and translated in the session and
  5. understanding the importance of appropriate clinical supervision whilst working with such clients.

Patricia Eschoe is a senior cognitive behavioural psychotherapist in Barnsley Primary Care NHS Trust.  She has wide ranging experience in working through interpreters and delivering training on the complexities of clinical work with this client group.
Linda Matthews is Consultant Psychotherapist and Clinical Lead in Primary Care Psychological Services for Barnsley Primary Care NHS Trust.  She has wide experience in the supervision of cases in which interpreters are used.      

Key references:
Tribe, R. & Raval, H.  (2002). Working with Interpreters in Mental Health. London; Brunner-Routledge
D'Ardenne, P. et al  (2007). Does Interpreter Mediated CBT with Traumatised Refugee People Work? Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy, 35, 203-31

Workshop11 - Queens Room D

Using self esteem groups as part of an intensive group programme for people with eating disorders
Linette Whitehead, Cotswold House, UK, and Jill Roberts, Oxford Cognitive Therapy Centre, UK

Work on self esteem is recognised as a valuable part of treating eating disorders (Fairburn 2008, Waller et al 2007) and is an area addressed in individual CBT work with this population.  As part of our intensive group programme offered to a  mixed group of in patients and day patients we include a 10 week self esteem group.  There is clear evidence for CBT in improving low self esteem (Fennel 2006).  However there are particular considerations in working with those with eating disorders which it is helpful to bear in mind.
Working with low self esteem is an increasingly valuable part of much work carried out in mental health settings and in primary care.   However it is important to tailor the work to the particular population and also recognise what the core aspects of this area of CBT are.

Learning objectives:
Participants will:

  1. Consider what may make working to improve self esteem particularly challenging for this population
  2. Take part in an exercise to explore how to bring some of these issues to light
  3. Consider how self esteem groups can both add to a person's sense of well being and help them invest in their own health

Linette Whitehead, Cotswold House. Linette Whitehead is a Consultant Clinical Psychologist and co founder of the Oxford and Bucks Eating Disorders Service.  She is an accredited BABCP psychotherapist and has taught and supervised on the Oxford Cognitive Therapy Diploma Course, as well as providing workshops for course graduates and for the Oxford Cognitive Therapy Centre.  She has co authored the chapter on eating disorders in the Oxford Guide to Behavioural Experiments in Cognitive Therapy, and has pioneered the use of CBT with day and in patients with severe eating disorders at OBEDS.
Jill Roberts is a clinical nurse specialist.  She is a supervisor on the Oxford Cognitive Therapy Diploma Course and also teaches on workshops for Oxford Cognitive Therapy Centre. She has co facilitated Self Esteem groups in the community for Oxfordshire MIND and now works as a CBT therapist in the Oxford and Bucks Eating Disorders Service.

Key references:
Fairburn, C G (2008) Cognitive Behaviour Therapy and Eating Disorders, New York, Guilford Press
Waller G, Cordery H, Corstorphine E, Hinrichsen H, Lawson R, Mountford V and Russell K (2007) Cognitive Behavioural Therapy for Eating Disorders, Cambridge, University Press
Fennell M (2006) Overcoming Low Self-Esteem, London, Robinson

Workshop 12 - Queens Room E

Positive Psychology Based Interventions
Dr Ilona Boniwell, University of East London, UK

Background:
Positive psychology is a rapidly developing field addressing factors that promote flourishing and optimal functioning in individuals and communities. It brings empirical research into the areas of well-being, happiness, flow, personal strengths, wisdom, creativity, imagination and the characteristics of positive groups and organisations. One of the major current priorities of positive psychology is to develop and examine simple interventions to enhance well-being using random assignment placebo controlled tests of their efficacy. This workshop will introduce participants to a number of evidence based positive psychology techniques, such as savouring, reflected best possible self, using signature strengths in a novel way, active-constructive responding, etc. In addition, it will examine some programmes of interventions, such as Quality of Life Therapy and Penn Resilience Programme that have been tested with normal and clinical populations.

Learning objectives:
This workshop is designed to:

  1. provide an overview of the positive psychology field;
  2. introduce and practice a number of positive psychology interventions that are broadly CBT compatible;
  3. examine some contexts in which positive psychology interventions are being utilised;
  4. critically discuss the usefulness of positive psychology interventions for CBT therapists.

Dr Ilona Boniwell is a Senior Lecturer in Positive Psychology at the University of East London, UK. She is the Programme Leader for the first Masters Degree in Applied Positive Psychology (MAPP) in Europe. She is currently the Vice-Chair of the International Positive Psychology Association (IPPA). Dr Boniwell founded and was the first Chair of the European Network of Positive Psychology and organised the first European Congress of Positive Psychology in June 2002 (Winchester). She acted as the main consultant for the BBC2 series "The Happiness Formula" (2006) and is the author of Positive Psychology in a Nutshell (2006).

Key references:
Frisch, M.B. (2007). Quality of life therapy: Applying a life satisfaction approach to positive psychology and cognitive therapy. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons.
Lyubomirsky, S., Sheldon, K. M., & Schkade, D. (2005). Pursuing happiness: The architecture of sustainable change. Review of General Psychology, 9, 111-131.
Seligman, M.E.P., Steen, T., Park, N., Peterson, P. (2005).  Positive Psychology Progress, Empirical Validation of Interventions.  American Psychologist, 60(5), 410-421.